Cat Vaccinations

We advise for yearly vaccinations for your cat as not only does it help prevent against common diseases, but also allows us to give a general health check.

 

We recommend giving the F3 vaccination yearly. It protects against feline infectious enteritis, calicivirus and rhinotracheitis.

 

Kittens should be vaccinated at 8, 12 and 16 weeks, before following with yearly boosters.

Diseases that can be vaccinated against

 

Feline infectious enteritis (panleukopenia)

Feline infectious enteritis (FIE), or feline panleukopenia, is caused by the feline parvovirus and is spread through faecal-oral contact. The disease is fatal and can cause severe gastroenteritis. There is no treatment available at present for FIE and it is highly contagious, so prevention is the best cure. FIE is a component of the standard F3 vaccine, which is recommended for all cats.

 

Calicivirus

Feline calicivirus (FCV) causes upper respiratory infections and oral disease in cats. The virus is highly contagious and will often cause a variety of secondary infections. Vaccinating against FCV does not necessarily prevent your cat from contracting an infection, due to the multiple virulent strains of FVC, but will reduce the severity if infected. FCV is a component of the standard F3 vaccine, which is recommended for all cats.

 

Rhinotracheitis

Similar to FVC, feline viral rhinotracheitis (FVR) causes upper respiratory infections, as well as conjunctivitis. The disease is caused by the herpesvirus so once infected, cats will often become carriers of the disease, the symptoms reappearing periodically. As there is no cure for infections caused by herpesvirus, prevention is crucial. FVR is a component of the standard F3 vaccine, which is recommended for all cats.

 

Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)

A cat infected with FIV has a weakened immune system, and is therefore open to a variety of secondary infections and diseases. Cats at risk are outdoor cats who are frequently involved in fights and cats living with FIV positive cats. Vaccination against FIV is only recommended for these at risk categories. Cats will need to be tested for FIV before vaccinating.

 

Feline leukemia virus (FeLV)

FeLV is a retrovirus, like FIV, that is a common cause of cancer in cats and can additionally cause blood disorders and immune deficiencies. The latter is of large concern as most diseases associted with FeLV are due to secondary infection. Cats at risk are outdoor cats who are frequently involved in fights and cats living with FIV positive cats. Vaccination against FeLV is only recommended for these at risk categories. Cats will need to be tested for FeLV before vaccinating.